Clark calls BCTF wage demands “unreasonable”

Vancouver, BC, Canada / (CKNW AM) AM980

Saying she still thinks a deal can be reached before teachers set up picket lines next week,  BC’s Premier continues to insist wage demands being made by union leaders are unreasonable.

Christy Clark says the latest offer from the government includes pay raises of 7.5 per cent over six years.

“All of that is consistent with what other public sector workers have got. I think it’s fair. It’s affordable for taxpayers.”

But after claiming she thinks a deal is within reach, she’s still taking shots at the BC Teachers Federation.

“I have to think there are lots of classroom teachers out there that don’t agree with the direction their union is taking.”

Clark later walked away as she was being asked how threatening to roll back the wages of teachers demonstrates governnment negotiators are bargaining in good faith.

Comments

  1. Wow. 7.5 over six years doesn’t seem nearly as unreasonable as the grand poo bah to England voted for themselves instantly. What was it. 50 odd % for the poo bah and 40 odd % for snookums and the rest of her ilk over night?

    And of course snookums wouldn’t answer anything about bargaining in good faith. She dropped out of school before she could understand what that actually means!!!!!

    YA NO

  2. Christy wants to provoke the union into a full scale strike so that she can save the day and fire them all! She would like nothing more than to finish what she started and a minister un Campbell. Gut the union!

    Perhaps if Iker looked a bit more professional, she just might sit down and wrangle a deal with him!

      • No, they should get raises based on two union taboo words – productivity and merit. You know, like the real world. But that won’t happen with public sector unions – which are far, far different than private sector unions who understand this most basic of economic concepts.

        • Many people have pointed out there is an “abundance of qualified unemployed teachers.” A result of this is that employers can be very picky and choosy about whom they hire. Typically, a new graduate will work as a TOC first for five years before being hired. This weeds out a lot of potential teacher applicants who do not develop an excellent track record of personal and professional integrity that gives the employer confidence that the individual will achieve a high degree of productivity and merit.

          None of us want to have poor quality teachers hired in the first place. As a result, teachers who get hired are a very high calibre to begin with.

          One of the big problems with ‘productivity and merit’ pay is how that is measured. Teachers motivated by $$ rather than by student-centred educational best practice are likely to put harmful pressure on students to perform. For example, they might require harmful burdens of homework, motivated by improving their own salary, rather than motivated by helping students develop in a balanced way.

    • Forget about the money! What about class size and class composition? Are you interested in the efficacy of the classroom? and the quality of our children’s education? I am! Everyone overlooks that aspect of this strike. Is this not convenient for your posts?

  3. Anyone who heard Christy’s call-in to CKNW’s sister station would have been terribly disappointed in what she had to say. She was flippant and was actually enjoying the fight with the BCTF. She had the opportunity to act very premier-like but she didn’t.

    While, I support the BCTF and the two recent court decisions, I would have given her begrudging respect had she appeared decisive and tough-but she didn’t. I suppose truckers’ strikes are more her cup of tea.

    But then, to her credit, she avoided MILF and cougar speak….

  4. Poor, poor teachers. So mistreated, disrespected, underpaid and forced to work in such horrible environments. No wonder so many teachers are quitting to take jobs in the private sector and University Education Colleges are virtually empty.

    Of course, none of this is true, because teachers know they have it pretty sweet.

    • Don,
      I believe you are erroneous on many aspects and I am hoping to enlighten you and others. The information that most people receive, is from the media that tries to propagate a dislike for public educators such as myself. I don’t know why, perhaps because we do not have a bottomless pit of funds to create ads and control the information like the government does, but we are screaming out for society to hear the truth, but the truth is muzzled. I cannot believe the difference in our system for the worse, since I began 15 years ago. The funding has been cut from 200 million dollars for public schools to 75 million in the past 4 years. That means there is much less help for kids when there are more and more needs coming in. Beloved music programs are being cut, art funding has been cut to equate 28 cents a kid. Imagine creating an art program (especially for kids who come to school on for art) on 28 cents for the whole year. Resource teachers, who used to pull students who needed extra help were cut and so children with needs are no longer getting extra help. Adult education programs are gone in our district as it not being funded adequately by the government. Sports programs are becoming extinct, funding for equipment has been cut, morale is at its all time low. Class sizes are the largest as they have ever been and needs are the highest they have ever been. There is no funding for teachers to collaborate on lessons as there once was – that is gone. There is no money for specialized teachers to train colleagues regarding the latest and greatest brain and learning research- those teachers have been laid off. Teacher librarians are becoming extinct in some districts which negatively affects a school community. There are no more full time counsellors when the needs for it is at an all time high. I could go on and on and on. Teachers did not sign the deal offered, not because we were not satisfied with the raise increase and possible signing bonus – but signing it would have gone against everything we are fighting for. We did not sign because it did not speak to class size composition and funding for resources, support in the classroom and overall funding. And on top of it all, we are being fined 10% for fighting for our students, we are being locked out and docked pay because we are fighting for more money for our students. I feel so incredibly tired, disheartened and disgusted at what is happening to our education system. I just don’t know how much worse it can get. I just hope this has at least helped one more person understand what is really happening in the classrooms. I can only hope.

      • Your comment well presented. Think on this idea though: hasn’t this whole mess been a result of the BCTF actions? Before you dismiss me, consider that NO governing party has ever had the goal of creating a poor educational system or under-funded over-crowded classrooms. These have become bargaining chips and that should NEVER have happened. No other union has power to dictate how an industry is run. Unions were rightly created to protect employee safety and wages not to form policy or governance. Teacher should and must be involved in these areas WITH other administrators and appropriate professionals. Education policy is solely a Department of Education responsibility and if it doesn’t meet public standards, the government of the day holds the responsibilty. If the government fails in its duty to provide excellence, it becomes an election issue and they can be tossed out. The public is now helpless with the model we have because the BCTF is not elected or accountable to serve us as taxpayers, parents and voters.
        We all want the best public education for our children as well as satisfied teachers but we are held at ransom by this high-and-might union.

        • Ron wrote,
          “NO governing party has ever had the goal of creating a poor educational system or under-funded over-crowded classrooms.” The more familiar you are with Education in BC, and the fact that our Premier chooses Private over Public education for her son, the more you will realize that creating a poor educational system, underfunded overcrowded classrooms is exactly what this government wants,
          Why? So that more people move their children out of the public system to the independent school sector, which costs half as much, or if you can think of it this way, gets people to voluntarily tax themselves to put their kids there. What drives that agenda? The answer is corporate control of education. There is little evidence that Christy Clark believes in Public Education, or its importance in our democracy. Christy has an unconditional regard for corporations–particularly the ones that help fund her party. Learn about “Teach for Canada” and Teach for America as examples.

        • Ron wrote,
          “NO governing party has ever had the goal of creating a poor educational system or under-funded over-crowded classrooms.” The more familiar you are with Education in BC, and the fact that our Premier chooses Private over Public education for her son, the more you will realize that creating a poor educational system, underfunded overcrowded classrooms is exactly what this government wants,
          Why? So that more people move their children out of the public system to the independent school sector, which costs half as much, or if you can think of it this way, gets people to voluntarily tax themselves to put their kids there. What drives that agenda? The answer is corporate control of education. There is little evidence that Christy Clark believes in Public Education, or its importance in our democracy. Christy has an unconditional regard for corporations–particularly the ones that help fund her party. Learn about several educational corporations, “Teach for Canada” and Teach for America as examples.

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